CQC Guidance For Adult Social Care Service Providers on Client Relationships and Sexuality – Are You Compliant?

The CQC has published new guidance setting out how care providers should consider people’s relationship and sexuality needs.

The guidance builds on the quality framework, adding further detail on issues like relationships, diversity and protecting people from harm.

It covers a diverse range of often complex issues, including supporting people to form and maintain relationships, while also helping them to understand risks. It also highlights the importance of offering an environment that is welcoming to LGBT+ people, as well as looking at how to support those with physical disabilities.

When people receive personal care and support, they are likely to lose some privacy. People may feel restricted or judged by those providing their care. Some people may find that their health condition leads them to become vulnerable, as they behave in ways that they would not have done before.

Providers need to understand the importance of enabling people to manage their sexuality needs whilst ensuring that they do not risk discriminating against other people or breaching their human rights.

In response to the new guidance Debbie Westhead, Acting Chief Inspector of Adult Social Care, said:

“We know that the best care is person-centred and in supporting relationships and sexuality there can be no one approach that fits all.

“Supporting people to build and maintain relationships in the way they want to is incredibly important, regardless of who they are or what stage of life they are at. This guidance aims to ensure providers are supporting people to form and maintain sexual relationships that meet their needs, while also helping them to understand risks.”

Key Lines of Enquiry

Inspector’s key lines of enquiry, and the evidence they will be looking for to demonstrate compliance are detailed below.

Protecting people from abuse and discrimination. Supporting people to understand what keeping safe means.

  • Safeguarding policy
  • Safeguarding records
  • Staff training records
  • Staff knowledge
  • People’s care plans
  • Feedback from people and relatives

Involving people in assessing risks to them. Policies minimise restriction of people’s freedom.

  • People’s risk assessments
  • Safeguarding and Equality policies
  • Staff training
  • Staff knowledge
  • People’s care plans
  • Feedback from people and relatives

Processes are in place to ensure people with protected characteristics experience no discrimination.

  • Safeguarding and Equality policies
  • Staff training records
  • Staff knowledge
  • Feedback from people and relatives

Staff receive training which enables them to meet people’s needs.

  • Training and Equality policies
  • Staff training records
  • Staff knowledge

People are supported to meet their day-to-day health needs and access healthcare services when required. This may include access to family planning services or support with gender identity issues.

  • People’s care plans
  • People’s care records
  • Feedback from people and relatives

Arrangements are made so people and visitors have appropriate space to spend time together, or for people to be alone.

  • People’s care plans
  • Staff knowledge
  • Feedback from people and relatives
  • Observations around the service

People are supported to make decisions in line with legislation. Best interest decisions cannot be made for people around sexual relations.

  • People’s care plans
  • People’s capacity assessments
  • Staff knowledge
  • Feedback from people and relatives

Communication with people is accessible. Care and support is provided in accordance with people’s preferences and personal histories. Staff respect people’s wishes.

  • People’s care plans
  • Staff knowledge
  • Feedback from people and relatives

People receive support to express their views and can access advocacy services, if required.

  • Staff knowledge
  • People’s care plans
  • Feedback from people and relatives.

People can be as independent as they wish. Visitors are made to feel welcome. Young adults have choice and flexibility over their privacy and level of parental involvement.

  • People’s care plans
  • Staff knowledge
  • Feedback from people and relatives

People’s care plans reflect their holistic needs, including their interests and aspirations. Activities are socially relevant. People are encouraged and supported to make and maintain relationships within the service and the wider community

  • People’s care plans
  • Staff knowledge
  • Feedback from people and relatives
  • Observations around the service

Vision and values include inclusion and respect.

  • Statement of Purpose
  • Staff knowledge
  • Feedback from people and relatives

Accessible and open communication is promoted.

  • Statement of Purpose
  • Communication policy
  • People’s care plans
  • Staff knowledge
  • Feedback from people and relatives

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.